• Word or Expression...
02/09/2021
THE FUTURE OF RESILIENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT IN CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS
2019
Paper
Resilience underpins the sustainability of both ecological and social systems. Extensive loss of reef corals following recent mass bleaching events have challenged the notion that support of system resilience is a viable reef management strategy. While resilience-based management (RBM) cannot prevent the damaging effects of major disturbances ...
First author: ELIZABETH MCLEOD
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.11.034
254
21/08/2021
PROTECT HIGH SEAS BIODIVERSITY
2021
Paper
First author: REBECCA R. HELM
DOI: 10.1126/science.abj0581
252
21/08/2021
INTEGRATE BIODIVERSITY TARGETS FROM LOCAL TO GLOBAL LEVELS
2021
Paper
Decisions to be made at the 15th Conference of the Parties (COP 15) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) will shape biodiversity conservation approaches for the next 30 years, a critical time for the future of nature and people. Reflecting from our African perspective, we applaud the necessary increase in ambition to conserve nature (1), but we share alarm about the limited equity and justice in establishment of protected areas and impacts on people (2–6)....
First author: DAVID O. OBURA
DOI: 10.1126/science.abh2234
251
21/08/2021
REFRAMING STRATEGIC, MANAGED RETREAT FOR TRANSFORMATIVE CLIMATE ADAPTATION
2021
Paper
Human societies will transform to address climate change and other stressors. How they choose to transform will depend on what societal values they prioritize. Managed retreat can play a powerful role in expanding the range of possible futures that transformation could achieve and in articulating the values that shape those futures...
First author: KATHARINE J. MACH
DOI: 10.1126/science.abh1894
250
21/08/2021
PATHWAYS TO COASTAL RETREAT
2021
Paper
Faced with global warming, rising sea levels, and the climate-related extremes they intensify, the question is no longer whether some communities will retreat—moving people and assets out of harm's way—but why, where, when, and how they will retreat. ...
First author: A.R. SIDERS
DOI: 10.1126/science.aax8346
249
09/08/2021
TIDAL WETLAND RESILIENCE TO SEA LEVEL RISE INCREASES THEIR CARBON SEQUESTRATION CAPACITY IN UNITED STATES
2019
Paper
Coastal wetlands are large reservoirs of soil carbon (C). However, the annual C accumulation rates contributing to the C storage in these systems have yet to be spatially estimated on a large scale. We synthesized C accumulation rate (CAR) in tidal wetlands of the conterminous United States (US), upscaled the CAR to national scale, and predicted trends based on climate change scenarios....
First author: FAMING WANG
248
09/08/2021
STORM SURGE AND PONDING EXPLAIN MANGROVE DIEBACK IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA FOLLOWING HURRICANE IRMA
2021
Paper
Mangroves buffer inland ecosystems from hurricane winds and storm surge. However, their ability to withstand harsh cyclone conditions depends on plant resilience traits and geomorphology. Using airborne lidar and satellite imagery collected before and after Hurricane Irma, we estimated that 62% of mangroves in southwest Florida suffered canopy damage, with largest impacts in tall forests (>10?m). Mangroves on well-drained sites (83%) resprouted new leaves within one year after the storm...
First author: DAVID LAGOMASINO
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-24253-y
247
09/08/2021
THE OCEAN, CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENCE: MAKING OCEAN AREAS BEYOND NATIONAL JURISDICTION MORE RESILIENT TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND OTHER ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES
2020
Paper
The ocean is threatened by climate change, overexploitation, pollution, habitat loss, and other pressures as well as their cumulative impacts. Over 60% of the ocean that lies in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) is particularly vulnerable. Many are seeking practical measures to make the ocean more resilient. This paper evaluates how key ingredients for enhancing resilience might be applied to ABNJ management and governance...
First author: SIDDHARTH SHEKHARYADAV
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2020.104184
246
09/08/2021
SEDIMENT CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY OF MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN SOUTHEASTERN BRAZILIAN COAST: A BASELINE FOR MANAGEMENT PLANNING
2021
Paper
Recent studies have shown that the effectiveness of establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) is threatened by toxic effects of contaminants. São Paulo is the most economically developed state of Brazil, and its coast is protected by a system of MPAs, including the North Shore Marine Protected Area (NSMPA). The present study provides a first assessment of sediment quality in NSMPA and two reference sites.
First author: LUCAS BURUAEMMOREIRA
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.112613
245
09/08/2021
TRANSBOUNDARY MARINE PROTECTED AREAS
2021
Paper
Countries exploiting transboundary natural resources face strong incentives to over-exploit. This basic economic insight has been validated empirically where numerous resources such as water, forests, game, and fisheries are found to be in worse condition than those completely contained in single nations. Attempts to solve this challenge through cross-country cooperation have been largely unsuccessful because competitive extraction is often more attractive than adhering to cooperative agreements. Focusing on the fishery, we explore the game-theoretic economics of an alternative to cooperative arrangements...
First author: CHRISTOPHER COSTELLO
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.reseneeco.2021.101239
244
09/08/2021
PROTECTED AREA DOWNGRADING, DOWNSIZING, AND DEGAZETTEMENT (PADDD) IN MARINE PROTECTED AREAS
2021
Paper
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are foundational to global marine biodiversity conservation efforts. Recently, countries have rapidly scaled up their MPA networks to meet targets established by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). While MPA networks are intended to permanently safeguard marine ecosystems, evidence points to widespread legal changes that temper, reduce, or eliminate protected areas, known as protected area downgrading, downsizing, and degazettement (PADDD).
First author: RENEEALBRECHT
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2021.104437
243
09/08/2021
TOWARDS THE ADAPTABILITY OF COASTAL RESILIENCE: VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS OF UNDERGROUND GAS PIPELINE SYSTEM AFTER HURRICANES USING LIDAR DATA
2021
Paper
The coastal pipeline is subjected to threats after extreme coastal weather events, however, most of the extant work fails to include pipeline risk assessment in the post-disaster coastal resilience evaluation, because the labor-intensive and time-consuming pipeline risk analysis techniques cannot be readily extended for disaster application...
First author: XIAMENGHUANG
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2021.105694
242
09/08/2021
ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING WITH OYSTERS ENHANCES COASTAL RESILIENCE EFFORTS
2021
Paper
Coastal areas are especially vulnerable to habitat loss, sea-level rise, and other climate change effects. Oyster-dominated eco-engineered reefs have been promoted as integral components of engineered habitats enhancing coastal resilience through provision of numerous ecological, morphological, and socio-economic services.des données pour son conservation dans encore faire ou acquérir
First author: MOHAMMED SHAH NAWAZCHOWDHURY ET DE
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2021.106320
241
13/07/2021
MODELLING HOLOCENE ANALOGUES OF COASTAL PLAIN ESTUARIES REVEALS THE MAGNITUDE OF SEA-LEVEL THREAT
2019
Paper
Hydrodynamic modelling of Australia’s lower Murray River demonstrates the response of a large coastal plain estuary to the mid-Holocene (7,000–6,000?yr BP) sea-level highstand. The approximately two metre higher-than-present sea level during the highstand forced the estuarine limit upstream generating an extensive central basin environment extending more than 200 kilometres from the river mouth (143 kilometres upstream of the modern tidal limit)...
First author: HELFENSDORFER, A.M.
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-39516-4
172
02/06/2021
TOWARDS FUTURE-ORIENTED CONSERVATION: MANAGING PROTECTED AREAS IN AN ERA OF CLIMATE CHANGE
2018
Paper
Management of protected areas must adapt to climate impacts, and prepare for ongoing ecological transformation. Future-Proofing Conservation is a dialogue-based, multi-stakeholder learning process that supports conservation managers to consider the implications of climate change for governance and management. It takes participants through a series of conceptual transitions to identify new management options...
First author: LORRAE VAN KERKHOFF
https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-018-1121-0
161
02/06/2021
STRATEGICALLY DESIGNED MARINE RESERVE NETWORKS ARE ROBUST TO CLIMATE CHANGE DRIVEN SHIFTS IN POPULATION CONNECTIVITY
2020
Paper
Marine reserves can be effective conservation and fishery management tools, particularly when their design accounts for spatial population connectivity. Yet climate change is expected to significantly alter larval connectivity of many marine species, questioning whether marine reserves designed today will still be effective in the future. Here we predict how alternative marine reserve designs will affect fishery yields...
First author: ANDREW RASSWEILER
https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab6a25
160
31/05/2021
LONG-TERM ECOLOGICAL CHANGES IN FISHES AND MACRO-INVERTEBRATES IN THE WORLD'S WARMEST CORAL REEFS
2021
Paper
The Arabian Gulf is a natural laboratory for examining the consequences of large-scale disturbances due to global warming on coral reef ecosystems because of its extreme temperature regime. Using a coral reef monitoring time series extending from 1985 to 2015, we examined the long-term ecological changes in fish and macro-invertebrate communities as these habitats suffered heat shocks.
First author: YU-JIA LIN
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.142254
159
31/05/2021
USING RESILIENCE ASSESSMENTS TO INFORM THE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION OF CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS
2021
Paper
Climate change is causing the decline of coral reef ecosystems globally. Recent research highlights the importance of reducing CO2 emissions in combination with implementing local management actions to support reef health and recovery, particularly actions that protect sites which are more resilient to extreme events. Resilience assessments quantify the ecological, social, and environmental context of reefs through the lens of resilience, i.e., the capacity of a system to absorb or withstand stressors such that the system maintains its structure and functions and has the capacity to adapt to future disturbances and changes. Resilience assessments are an important tool to help marine managers and decision makers anticipate changes, identify areas with high survival prospects, and prioritize management actions to support resilience ...
First author: ELIZABETH MCLEOD
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2020.111384
158
31/05/2021
TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS AND DELAYS PRESENT CONTRASTING PICTURES OF TRAFFIC RESILIENCE TO COASTAL FLOODING IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, USA
2021
Paper
Climate change is intensifying coastal floods and increasing the risks of traffic disruption in low-lying, coastal communities. Efforts to understand the differential impacts of traffic disruption on communities have led to the concept of traffic resilience which captures the degree to which a traffic system can recover from disruption
First author: INDRANEEL KASMALKAR
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.uclim.2021.100851
157
14/05/2021
TIDAL WETLAND RESILIENCE TO SEA LEVEL RISE INCREASES THEIR CARBON SEQUESTRATION CAPACITY IN UNITED STATES
2019
Paper
Coastal wetlands are large reservoirs of soil carbon (C). However, the annual C accumulation rates contributing to the C storage in these systems have yet to be spatially estimated on a large scale. We synthesized C accumulation rate (CAR) in tidal wetlands of the conterminous United States (US), upscaled the CAR to national scale, and predicted trends based on climate change scenarios.;;
First author: FAMING WANG
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13294-z
156
14/05/2021
GOVERNING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS: SOCIAL–ECOLOGICAL RESILIENCE THROUGH INSTITUTIONAL DIVERSITY
2013
Paper
First author: P.J.S. JONES
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2012.12.026
155
23/04/2021
OPERATIONALISING COASTAL RESILIENCE TO FLOOD AND EROSION HAZARD: A DEMONSTRATION FOR ENGLAND
2021
Paper
Resilience is widely seen as an important attribute of coastal systems and, as a concept, is increasingly prominent in policy documents. However, there are conflicting ideas on what constitutes resilience and its operationalisation as an overarching principle of coastal management remains limited. In this paper, we show how resilience to coastal flood and erosion hazard could be measured and applied within policy processes ...
First author: I.H.TOWNEND
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146880
154
17/02/2021
STORM IMPACTS ON A COUPLED HUMAN-NATURAL COASTAL SYSTEM: RESILIENCE OF DEVELOPED COASTS
2021
Paper
Human occupation of and alteration of the world's coast has transformed large stretches of it into Coupled Human-Natural Systems (CHANS) in which humans both influence and are influenced by coastal evolution. In such systems, human activity is as critical on natural resilience as processes and sediment supply derived from the natural setting...
First author: G.MALVAREZ
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.144987
129
07/02/2021
GESTION DES ZONES COTIERES - MANUEL 12
2010
Other
Les travaux préparatoires des Principes et lignes directrices pour inscrire les questions relatives aux zones humides dans la gestion intégrée des zones côtières (GIZC) ont été réalisés par le Groupe d’experts sur la GIZC du Groupe d’évaluation scientifique et technique (GEST), sous la direction du professeur Angel Alcala. D’autres contributions importantes sont à mettre au crédit du professeur Yara Schaeffer-Novelli, de Gilberto Cintron et de Margarita Astrálaga [qui était alors] la Coordonnatrice régionale du Secrétariat Ramsar pour les Amériques,. Un avant-projet a été préparé par Ivica Trumbic, Directeur du programme d’action prioritaire/Centre d’activité régional (Plan d’action pour la Méditerranée) du PNUE. Le gouvernement des États-Unis d’Amérique a accordé un appui financier à ces travaux.
First author: RAMSAR CONVENTION
126
07/02/2021
COASTAL DEVELOPMENT AND RISKS OF FLOODING IN MOROCCO: THE CASES OF TAHADDART AND SAIDIA COASTS
2020
Paper
Coastal areas provide a large array of ecosystems services, contributing to the economic welfare of local communities. However, they are more and more submitted to both human pressures and natural forcing. Climate change creates additional risks and is expected to intensify the loss and degradation of coastal low lying-areas. The aim of this paper is to assess the risk of flooding due to sea-level rise and storm-surges for two Moroccan coasts: Tahaddart, a relatively underdeveloped coast and Saidia which has experienced intense urbanization over the last decade...
First author: RAJAA ATALI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jafrearsci.2020.103771
125
07/02/2021
EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL FOR AUTONOMOUS MEASUREMENTS OF NET COMMUNITY PRODUCTION AND CALCIFICATION AS A TOOL FOR MONITORING CORAL RESTORATION
2020
Paper
As coral restoration efforts increase globally, there is a growing need to not only increase post-restoration monitoring, but also advance reef restoration monitoring methods. Utilizing autonomous technology to compliment manual, SCUBA-based monitoring will diversify the types of data available to coral restoration...
First author: MICHELLE C. PLATZ
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2020.106042
124
19/01/2021
STEP ZERO OF MARINE PROTECTED AREAS OF BRAZIL
2020
Paper
Despite the efforts to improve marine conservation through marine protected areas, effective management is challenging. Challenges in management have been attributed, amongst other reasons, to the initial process of Marine Protected Area (MPA) creation...
First author: ANA CLARAGIRALDI-COSTA
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2020.104119
117
19/01/2021
VULNERABILITY TO WATERSHED EROSION AND COASTAL DEPOSITION IN THE TROPICS
2021
Paper
Over half of the global population is projected to live in the tropics by 2050. Sustainable land development will be challenged by enhanced sediment erosion and deposition, which can negatively impact water quality and ecosystem services in inland and coastal waterways....
First author: TREVOR N. BROWNING
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79402-y
116
17/01/2021
PROTECTIVE BEHAVIORS REGARDING COASTAL FLOODING RISK IN A CONTEXT OF CLIMATE CHANGE
2020
Paper
The physical vulnerability of coastal areas due to rising sea level and the flooding risk consequent, does not guarantee the implementation of protective behaviors by these risk zones’ inhabitants. This study aims to establish the link between the willingness to carry out protective behaviors and physical and perceived indicators of vulnerability...
First author: COLINLEMEE
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.accre.2020.12.001
115
14/01/2021
STRATEGIES FOR GOVERNMENTS TO HELP CLOSE THE COASTAL ADAPTATION FUNDING GAP
2020
Paper
Established coastal protection funding approaches, such as general taxation, intergovernmental transfers (grants with no obligation for repayment), and private investment to protect private property are constrained in meeting the funding required for future coastal protection needs in many areas. The coastal adaptation funding gap ...
First author: DANIELWARE
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2020.105223
111
10/01/2021
MEASURING, MODELLING AND PROJECTING COASTAL LAND SUBSIDENCE
2020
Paper
Coastal subsidence contributes to relative sea-level rise and exacerbates flooding hazards, with the at-risk population expected to triple by 2070. Natural processes of vertical land motion, such as tectonics, glacial isostatic adjustment and sediment compaction, as well as anthropogenic processes, such as fluid extraction, lead to globally variable subsidence rates. In this Review, we discuss the key physical processes driving vertical land motion in coastal areas ...
First author: MANOOCHEHR SHIRZAEI
https://doi.org/10.1038/s43017-020-00115-x
109
19/12/2020
CLIMATE RESILIENCE IN MARINE PROTECTED AREAS AND THE ‘PROTECTION PARADOX’
2019
Paper
Protected areas can foster resistance and recovery under climate variability
Mechanisms stem from protection-related increases in food webs, habitats and diversity of communities and populations
Yet species protected from activities such as fishing can also be vulnerable to climate stressors – the ‘Protection Paradox’
The only primary option for reducing the impact of climate change on protected areas is to reduce carbon emissions
In the meantime strategic networks of protected areas which plan for climate change are needed
First author: AMANDA E.BATES
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2019.05.005
73
08/12/2020
ATLAS CARTOGRAPHIQUE DU DROIT DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT MARIN EN AFRIQUE DE L’OUEST. MÉTHODOLOGIE ET USAGE POUR LA PLANIFICATION SPATIALE
2020
Paper
The article presents a methodology leading to the mapping of marine and coastal environmental law in West Africa, using a geographic information base to produce static or interactive cartographic representations via a Geographic Data Infrastructure (GDI). It shows the contribution of this type of mapping to a transversal approach in a multi-activity, multi-sectoral and multi-scale context.
First author: MATTHIEU LE TIXERANT
https://doi.org/10.4000/cybergeo.35598
71
08/12/2020
A SUSTAINABLE COLLABORATORY FOR COASTAL RESILIENCE RESEARCH
2020
Paper
Our coastal model repository predicts storm surges, tsunamis, flooding, and more.
Our system will make it easier for scientists to model hazards and share data.
We use advanced cyberinfrastructure to make experiments repeatable and easy to use.
Our software and the models it leverages are open source and free to use.
First author: SHUAI YUAN
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.future.2019.11.002
70
08/12/2020
ENHANCING CLIMATE RESILIENCE OF VERTICAL SEAWALL WITH RETROFITTING - A PHYSICAL MODELLING STUDY
2020
Paper
New information on the performance of retrofitting structures with various geometry in front of vertical seawalls is presented.
The analysis of wave-by-wave and mean overtopping discharges show the superior performance of recurve wall in mitigating mean and extreme overtopping events.
The vegetation and reef breakwater retrofitting configurations are proven to be effective in mitigating wave overtopping from vertical seawall.
The physical modelling data indicate significance of relative freeboard, wave impulsiveness and the structural geometry on the performance of retrofitting .
A new set of empirical formulae are derived from laboratory measurements, enabling robust prediction of mean overtopping from the retrofitting .
First author: S. DONG
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apor.2020.102331
69
08/12/2020
KEY COASTAL LANDSCAPE PATTERNS FOR REDUCING FLOOD VULNERABILITY
2020
Paper
Landscape pattern is related with flood vulnerability based on hydrologic process.
Urban forest, grassland, and water are key coastal landscape patterns.
Green infrastructure without considering landscape pattern can increase flood risk.
Dispersed patches of grassland should be integrated with forest and used area.
LID is an effective way to adopt green into gray infrastructure in coastal cities.
First author: MIN KIM
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.143454
68
08/12/2020
IMPACT OF INFORMATION SEEKING, DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND TYPHOON EMERGENCY RESPONSE ON PERCEIVED COMMUNITY RESILIENCE IN HONG KONG
2020
Paper
Majority used at least two channels to acquire typhoon-related information.
High connections among informaiton seeking, disaster preparedness, emergency response and perceived community resilience.
Utilisation of traditional and new informaiton channels had different impacts on perceived community resilience.
Synergize top-down and bottom-up risk information to increase perceived community resilience.
First author: CHUNLAN GUO
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101744
67
08/12/2020
HARNESSING NEW DATA TECHNOLOGIES FOR NATURE-BASED SOLUTIONS IN ASSESSING AND MANAGING RISK IN COASTAL ZONES
2020
Paper
We review several case studies where ecosystem benefits were quantified based on new data technologies and used for policy and investment strategies to improve a broader suite of ecosystem benefits to coastal communities. Equipping public and private sector actors with cost-effective and accessible approaches and tools to incorporate nature-based solutions into disaster risk management and coastal zone management planning more generally can transform climate resilience strategies around the world.
First author: MARY RUCKELSHAUS
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101795
66
08/12/2020
UNCOVERING CLIMATE (IN)JUSTICE WITH AN ADAPTIVE CAPACITY ASSESSMENT: A MULTIPLE CASE STUDY IN RURAL COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA
2020
Paper
Underserved rural coastal communities of color face a unique adaptation context.
Engagement with underserved communities reduces perceived adaptive capacity.
Perceived climate injustices pose barriers to coastal hazard adaptation, revealing instances of adaptation oppression.
Improved outreach strategies are needed to overcome color blindness within climate science communication.
First author: MATTHEW JURJONAS
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2020.104547
65
08/12/2020
CHAPTER 32 - MAINTAINING ECOLOGICAL RESILIENCE ON A REGIONAL SCALE: COASTAL SALINE LAGOONS IN A NORTHERN EUROPEAN MARINE PROTECTED AREA
2020
Paper
Here we report on a variety of approaches and cases studies aimed at maintaining ecosystem resilience in Poole Harbour Special Protection Area (SPA) on the south coast of England by (i) creating new lagoon habitats (ii) restoring undesignated, degraded and polluted lagoons (iii) identifying and survey new coastal lagoon habitats. Although sea level rise presents considerable challenges for the conservation of these habitats, new managed realignment projects and set-back schemes offer significant opportunities for the creation of lagoons. A principle of continual review, monitoring and pro-active spatial planning needs to be extended to the design of other regional and national coastal MPA networks to maintain ecosystem integrity and resilience.
First author: ROGER J.H. HERBERT
https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-102698-4.00032-0
64
08/12/2020
ENHANCING NEW YORK CITY'S RESILIENCE TO SEA LEVEL RISE AND INCREASED COASTAL FLOODING
2020
Paper
Accelerating ice losses, advanced modeling, and potential WAIS destabilization may lead to upper-bound sea level rise (SLR).
Upper-end, low probability SLR scenarios such as ARIM should be considered
ARIM projects a NYC SLR of 2.1 m by the 2080s and 2.9 m by 2100 at high CO2 levels.
Low-lying communities around Jamaica Bay, NYC will be at very high risk to increasing coastal hazards
Existing, planned coastal defenses will need strengthening; managed relocation and buyout may become necessary.
First author: VIVIEN GORNITZ
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.uclim.2020.100654
63
08/12/2020
THE END OF RESILIENCE: SURPASSED NITROGEN THRESHOLDS IN COASTAL WATERS LED TO SEVERE SEAGRASS LOSS AFTER DECADES OF EXPOSURE TO AQUACULTURE EFFLUENTS
2020
Paper
Eutrophication through aquaculture effluents causes biodiversity and seagrass loss.
Seagrass aboveground biomass declined by 87% in one decade.
15N values in seagrass leaves were among the highest measured worldwide.
Thalassia hemprichii appears to be the most resistant species.
We found DIN concentration thresholds for seagrass occurrence and abundance.
First author: ESTHER THOMSEN
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.uclim.2020.100654
62
08/12/2020
APPLYING TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE TO RESILIENCE IN COASTAL RURAL VILLAGES
2020
Paper
The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) pointed out that since 1950, observations of various aspects of the climate system have revealed many changes in extreme weather events. Global climate change has increased both the intensity and frequency of disaster events, causing serious impacts worldwide. Because most people and economic activities are clustered in urban areas, most studies focus on how to enhance the resilience of urban areas, often overlooking the practicable resilience in rural areas, especially in radically different areas, such as coastal and alpine areas. There should be a fundamentally different resilience approaches in areas with low population densities, weak institutional capacities, and limited financial feasibility. The application of local and indigenous knowledge as an adaptation strategy for climate change to achieve the goal of balance between humans and nature has also received considerable attention. Therefore, this study applied in-depth interviews in the coastal rural village of Guogou in Taiwan. The results showed that practices utilizing local and indigenous knowledge have helped locals effectively mitigate the impacts of disasters and encouraged residents to live in areas with high flood exposure. Overall, the application of local and indigenous knowledge in such rural areas might be a possible solution to enhance local resilience.
First author: TZU-LING CHEN
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101564
61
08/12/2020
FINANCING COASTAL RESILIENCE BY COMBINING NATURE-BASED RISK REDUCTION WITH INSURANCE
2020
Paper
This article explores a resilience solution that combines risk transfer (e.g., insurance) with risk reduction (e.g., hazard mitigation), which have often been treated as two separate mechanisms for disaster risk management. The combined mechanism could help align environmental and risk management goals and create opportunities for public and private investment in nature-based projects. We assessed this resilience insurance with hypothetical cases for coral reef restoration. Under conservative assumptions, 44% of the initial reef restoration costs would be covered just by insurance premium reductions in the first 5 years, with benefits amounting >6 times the total costs over 25 years. We also test the sensitivity to key factors such as project cost, risk reduction potential, insurance structure, economic exposure and discount rates. The resilience insurance mechanism is applicable to many coastlines and can help finance nature-based adaptation.
First author: BORJA G. REGUERO
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2019.106487
60
08/12/2020
STAKEHOLDER-DEFINED SCIENTIFIC NEEDS FOR COASTAL RESILIENCE DECISIONS IN THE NORTHEAST U.S.
2020
Paper
A federal role in local resilience efforts is crucial for local voices to be heard.
Adaptation of vulnerable infrastructure is top priority for communities.
More research is needed on how and where to implement nature-based solutions.
More evaluation of the economic costs of climate change to stakeholders is desired.
Social science research needs to support resilience efforts were largely absent.
First author: GRACE D.MOLINO
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2020.103987
59
08/12/2020
THE RESILIENCE OF COASTAL MARSHES TO HURRICANES: THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF EXCESS NUTRIENTS
2020
Paper
The marsh growing season was shortened by hurricanes and recovered the following year.
The marsh area substantially decreased after hurricanes and rebounded in two years.
The intermediate and brackish marshes in the Breton Sound Basin showed the most damage.
Long-term nutrient enrichment may impair the marshes’ resilience against hurricanes.
First author: YU MO
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.105409
58
08/12/2020
ENHANCING THE RESILIENCE OF HIGH-VULNERABILITY, LOW-ELEVATION COASTAL ZONES
2020
Paper
Complex socio-environmental connectivity in relation to climate change pressures.
Large areas of low-lying land so coastal dune ridge has high protective function.
High natural and social capital justifies particular focus.
High community awareness/engagement confers likely success of resilience planning.
Introduction and context.
First author: STEWART ANGUS
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2020.105414
57
08/12/2020
RESILIENCE PLANNING IN HAZARDS-HUMANS-INFRASTRUCTURE NEXUS: A MULTI-AGENT SIMULATION FOR EXPLORATORY ASSESSMENT OF COASTAL WATER SUPPLY INFRASTRUCTURE ADAPTATION TO SEA-LEVEL RISE
2020
Paper
Climatic hazard stressors are the most significant determinant of resilience in coastal water infrastructure systems.
Adaptive planning approach would increase the likelihood of achieving greater resilience.
Reactive planning approaches are unable to fully close the resilience gap induced by uncertainty.
Robust adaptation decision-making would enhance the long-term resilience of infrastructure systems.
First author: KAMBIZ RASOULKHANI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2020.104636
56
08/12/2020
USING A RESILIENCE THINKING APPROACH TO IMPROVE COASTAL GOVERNANCE RESPONSES TO COMPLEXITY AND UNCERTAINTY: A TASMANIAN CASE STUDY, AUSTRALIA
2020
Paper
Prevailing neoliberal mindsets focus on creating “fail-safe” systems.
Resilience thinking suggests a transition towards more adaptive approaches.
We suggested a hybrid risk-resilience approach of for Tasmanian coastal governance.
The approach facilitates an entrepreneurial leadership and stakeholder engagement.
First author: JAVAD JOZAEI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.109662
55
08/12/2020
BARRIERS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR BENEFICIAL REUSE OF SEDIMENT TO SUPPORT COASTAL RESILIENCE
2020
Paper
Beneficial reuse of sediment benefits coastal resilience and sustainability.
Interviews with sediment managers highlight barriers and opportunities for beneficial reuse.
Barriers to beneficial reuse include financial, regulatory, technical, & psychological factors.
Addressing these barriers can make beneficial reuse a more widespread practice.
First author: NICOLA ULIBARRI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2020.105287
54
08/12/2020
MEASURING COMMUNITY RESILIENCE AGAINST COASTAL HAZARDS: CASE STUDY IN BARON BEACH, GUNUNGKIDUL REGENCY
2020
Paper
The objectives of the research are the research is intended to measure the resilience of coastal community through collective resilience assessment and bottom-up approach in community level. Based on overall scores, mix-livelihood community is categorized as medium resilience with the score of (1.99), whereas fishery community (2.3) and tourism community (2.5) are categorized as high resilience score. The result of the participatory approach suggests that communities in Baron Beach are highly aware of the importance of the coastal environment especially within karst ecosystem.
First author: ARIE NURZAMAN
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pdisas.2020.100067
53
08/12/2020
ASSESSING ECOSYSTEM RESILIENCE TO A TROPICAL CYCLONE BASED ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICE SUPPLY PROFICIENCY USING GEOSPATIAL TECHNIQUES AND SOCIAL RESPONSES IN COASTAL BANGLADESH
2020
Paper
We assessed ecosystem resilience after tropical Cyclone Sidr in Bangladesh.
Ecosystem service proficiency was monitored during several disaster phases.
We used geoinformatics and social responses to map ecosystem service proficiency.
Despite severe destruction, most ecosystems recovered significantly.
This study provides meaningful insights into post-disaster ecosystem behavior.
First author: MD ASHRAFUL ISLAM
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101667
52
08/12/2020
BUILDING RESILIENCE TO NATURAL HAZARDS THROUGH COASTAL GOVERNANCE: A CASE STUDY OF HURRICANE HARVEY RECOVERY IN GULF OF MEXICO COMMUNITIES
2020
Paper
This paper provides an evidence-based contribution to understanding coastal governance in response to hurricane hazards. It uses the five-part conceptual framework for coastal governance, which includes 1) complexity, 2) vulnerability, 3) adaptive management, 4) stakeholder participation, and 5) the integration of technical knowledge in decision-making.
First author: KELLY HEBER DUNNING
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2020.106759
51
08/12/2020
RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS BASED SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS AND ASSESSMENT OF COASTAL URBAN AREAS ——A CASE STUDY OF DAPENG NEW DISTRICT, SHENZHEN, CHINA
2020
Paper
We propose a novel and integrated land-sea technology for social-ecological resilience assessment on coastal urban systems.
Resilience can be served as an effective mechanism for adapting rapid urbanization and achieving SDGs in coastal areas.
The Dapeng case study provides a new solution for urban resilience management based on SDGs in China
First author: JINGJING LIANG
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsee.2020.06.001
50
08/12/2020
COORDINATED PLANNING EFFORT AS MULTILEVEL CLIMATE GOVERNANCE: INSIGHTS FROM COASTAL RESILIENCE AND CLIMATE ADAPTATION
2020
Paper
Using flood risks and potential impacts of sea level change within the U.S. Great Lakes region over the past 20 years, we explore the association between coordinated planning effort as a form of multilevel climate governance and community resilience attributes under climate risk. Content analysis and coastal adaptation principles allowed us to evaluate coordinated planning effort at county and state levels to derive a horizontal or vertical coordination index which was then used to evaluate if synergies generated among plans were correlated with climate risk mitigation and enhanced adaptation to climate change. Further, we incorporated evaluation results of varied community resilience characteristics and coordinated planning effort metrics in the context of climate change. Empirical results suggest that the extent of coordinated planning effort at the county and state levels is closely associated with coastal community resilience and climate change adaptation.

First author: HYUN KIM
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2020.05.023
49
08/12/2020
CORAL REEF MICROORGANISMS IN A CHANGING CLIMATE
2020
Paper
Coral reefs are one of the most diverse and productive ecosystems on the planet, yet they have suffered tremendous losses due to anthropogenic disturbances and are predicted to be one of the most adversely affected habitats under future climate change conditions. Coral reefs can be viewed as microbially driven ecosystems that rely on the efficient capture, retention, and recycling of nutrients in order to thrive in oligotrophic waters. Microorganisms play vital roles in maintaining holobiont health and ecosystem resilience under environmental stress; however, they are also key players in positive feedback loops that intensify coral reef decline, with cascading effects on biogeochemical cycles and marine food webs. There is an urgent need to develop a fundamental understanding of the complex microbial interactions within coral reefs and their role in ecosystem acclimatization, and it is important to include microorganisms in reef conservation in order to secure a future for these unique environments.
First author: INKA VANWONTERGHEM
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2020.100972
48
08/12/2020
SYNERGIC EFFECT OF GLOBAL THERMAL ANOMALIES AND LOCAL DREDGING ACTIVITIES ON CORAL REEFS OF THE MALDIVES
2020
Paper
Impact of local land reclamation activities was evaluated in the Maldives.
A BACI (Before-After Control-Impact) design was adopted.
A synergy between the local impact and the 2016 mass bleaching has been detected.
Substrate indicators were more sensitive than fish and macro-invertebrates.
The Reef Check protocol is more effective for long-term monitoring.
First author: IRENE PANCRAZI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111585
47
08/12/2020
SPATIAL VARIATION AND AVAILABILITY OF NUTRIENTS AT AN OYSTER REEF IN RELATION TO SUBMARINE GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE
2020
Paper
Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is significant at oyster reefs.
Oyster reefs parallel to paleovalley margins receive significant SGD.
In semiarid estuaries, SGD nutrient fluxes at a reef area rival riverine input.
SGD-derived fluxes support the reef area estuary water nutrient inventories.
SGD-enhanced primary production support suspension feeding by oysters.
First author: NICHOLAS SPALT
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.136283
46
08/12/2020
THE 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF POCILLOPORA COLONY SHEDS LIGHT ON THE GROWTH PATTERN OF THIS REEF-BUILDING CORAL
2020
Paper
We use high-resolution computed tomography to investigate coral forming and polyp budding processes
The calice reconstruction shows coral growth patterns and budding information
Our work visualizes the growth pattern of Pocillopora damicornis
High-resolution computed tomography is a method for future reef-building coral studies
First author: YIXIN LI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2020.101069
45
08/12/2020
ADVANCING CORAL REEF GOVERNANCE INTO THE ANTHROPOCENE
2020
Paper
The unprecedented global heatwave of 2014–2017 was a defining event for many ecosystems. Widespread degradation caused by coral bleaching, for example, highlighted the vulnerability of hundreds of millions of people dependent on reefs for their livelihoods, well-being, and food security. Scientists and policy makers are now reassessing long-held assumptions about coping with anthropogenic climate change, particularly the assumption that strong local institutions can maintain ecological and social resilience through ecosystem-based management, adaptation, and restoration. Governance is struggling to address the new normal as ecosystem assemblages transform to novel configurations. A central challenge for policy makers in the Anthropocene is navigating environmental crises and coping with societal insecurity and change. Ecosystem governance needs a new paradigm to embrace rapid change and shape future trajectories. In this Perspective, we focus on coral reefs as vanguards for governance transformation. We explain the spatial, temporal, and political dynamics of reefs as they respond to climate change and outline a new governance paradigm applicable to all ecosystems.
First author: TIFFANY H.MORRISON
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oneear.2019.12.014
44
08/12/2020
FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF THREE COMMON ARTIFICIAL REEF DESIGNS DURING EARLY COLONIZATION
2020
Paper
Fish abundance and biomass differed per artificial reef type.
This difference is driven by the availability of small shelters.
Artificial reef deployment can be more efficient by choosing better performing or cheaper designs.
First author: ALWIN HYLKEMA
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2020.105994
43
08/12/2020
DIFFERENTIAL DISTURBANCE EFFECTS AND PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY AMONG OUTPLANTED CORALS AT PATCH AND FORE REEF SITES
2020
Paper
Practitioners have outplanted tens of thousands of nursery-reared coral colonies for restoration purposes, and interest in outplanting is increasing. However, restoration outcomes on natural reefs can be variable, and genotype- and site-specific differences have been reported. To systematically explore these differences, performance of restored corals was compared at two site types, and intraspecific variation in phenotype among six genotypes previously characterized in a nursery was simultaneously assessed...
First author: KATHRYN E.LOHR
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2020.125827
42
08/12/2020
CORAL DISEASE CAUSES, CONSEQUENCES, AND RISK WITHIN CORAL RESTORATION
2020
Paper
Conservation efforts coupled with local-scale restoration have now become a high priority for coral reefs worldwide.
Coral mortality and disease events have remained high when corals are returned to their reef habitat.
Restoration efforts are not yet able to manage mortality events, or the risks of disease spread to neighboring reefs.
There are ongoing shortfalls in our understanding of both coral disease and mortality, particularly when applied to coral outplanting and mariculture.
Understanding the underlying microbial, biological, and environmental drivers of mortality and disease in restoration programs provides a means by which to develop optimal strategies to support coral survival.
First author: T.MORIARTY
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tim.2020.06.002
41
08/12/2020
DEVELOPMENT OF A REEF FISH BIOLOGICAL CONDITION GRADIENT MODEL WITH QUANTITATIVE DECISION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION AND RESTORATION OF CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS
2020
Paper
An integrated ecologically-broad systems approach enhances coral reef ecosystem protection.
Biological Condition Gradients track ecosystem status as a function of anthropogenic stress.
The reef fish BGC model was effective in identification of impaired coral reef ecosystems
The reef fish BGC model has potential global application when calibrated with local data.
First author: PATRICIA BRADLEY
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111387
40
08/12/2020
TROPHIC INTERACTIONS IN CORAL REEF RESTORATION
2020
Paper
Ecology plays a central role in the management and conservation of ecosystems. However, as coral restoration emerges as an increasingly popular method of confronting the global decline of tropical coral reefs, an ecological basis to guide restoration remains under-developed. Here, we examine potential contributions that trophic ecology can make to reef restoration efforts.
First author: MARK C.LADD
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fooweb.2020.e00149
39
08/12/2020
CHANGES IN MOTILE BENTHIC FAUNAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE FOLLOWING LARGE-SCALE OYSTER REEF RESTORATION IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY
2020
Paper
Motile benthic organisms are one important metric for assessing restoration success.
Convergence between restored and natural motile oyster reef communities took <22 mo.
Juvenile organisms were largely responsible for initial colonization of restored reef.
Small increases in vertical relief greatly increased biomass at restored oyster reef.
High-relief areas = greater oyster growth, higher rugosity, and reduced sedimentation.
First author: ZACHARY R.JUD
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fooweb.2020.e00177
38
08/12/2020
COORDINATED PLANNING EFFORT AS MULTILEVEL CLIMATE GOVERNANCE: INSIGHTS FROM COASTAL RESILIENCE AND CLIMATE ADAPTATION
2020
Paper
Using flood risks and potential impacts of sea level change within the U.S. Great Lakes region over the past 20 years, we explore the association between coordinated planning effort as a form of multilevel climate governance and community resilience attributes under climate risk ...
First author: HYUN KIM
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2020.05.023
37
08/12/2020
ENHANCING THE RESILIENCE OF HIGH-VULNERABILITY, LOW-ELEVATION COASTAL ZONES
2020
Other
This paper aims to explore how resilience to climate change can be achieved and optimised within an example of a complex, high-vulnerability and low-elevation coastal zone. In Uist, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, a completed INTERREG project provided a framework for resilience planning in a complex, multifaceted environment, where official bodies, NGOs, academics and the community already work together productively. A range of approaches to coping with climate change in Uist is reviewed, some of these originating from within the community, and the local situation is discussed in the context of the extent to which resilience theory and national policy intertwine. These approaches identify and combine nature-based solutions and compatible engineering-based solutions, demonstrating how resilience can be achieved and enhanced in a vulnerable area via sustained engagement with local communities backed by peer-reviewed research and complying with the policy context.
First author: STEWART ANGUSA
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pdisas.2019.100057
36
08/12/2020
MEASURING COASTAL CITIES' RESILIENCE TOWARD COASTAL HAZARDS: INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION
2019
Paper
This study aims to design and validate a comprehensive assessment tool that measures the coastal cities' resilience toward coastal hazards. instrument development process adhered to the research and development methodology that involves: i) literature rev …
First author: RINA SURYANIOKTARI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pdisas.2019.100057
33
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